revision

This Place Called Revision

>Rewrite…revision…deep edits…

I never know exactly what description to use for this current project phase. But whatever the label there is no denying it is a tough place to dwell. Well past the initial excitement of the idea, beyond the satisfaction of seeing the first draft come together in a rough, misshapen canvass, this is where I look at my story and think all sorts of disparaging things.

This is so boring. There is nothing original about this. At what point did I think this was a good idea? And what had I been smoking that morning?

Recently, I read a post by Scott Eagan that spoke to some of the realities in the publishing industry that get under writers’ skin and fester, spurring this revision syndrome.

Sure, editors want books to sell, but they also want a writer that can grow and develop over time. This means that it is your responsibility to find a way to keep progressing with your writing. Your job is to maintain that voice that you were signed for, but to always find a way to reinvent yourself…

…finding new twists and turns, it doesn’t mean simply putting it in a new setting, or changing from vamps and weres to angels and demons. We are talking about twists with the plot or characters voices.

As a writer, think about your writing as always moving forward and up. We don’t want to see the same thing over and over again.

So, yeah, I’m doing a little extra head banging to make the above happen. It’s not exactly comfortable, but I know I’m not alone. It’s nothing original or unique. Every writer feels it for their work at some point. I’ve heard many a colleague express the same sentiments. And I know it’s simply a phase, something that I’ll work through and love my story and the progress I’ve made once again…at some point.

Usually happens for me right around the 2/3 mark. About chapter 16-18 or so. When (if ever) does it happen for you?

>This Place Called Revision

>Rewrite…revision…deep edits…

I never know exactly what description to use for this current project phase. But whatever the label there is no denying it is a tough place to dwell. Well past the initial excitement of the idea, beyond the satisfaction of seeing the first draft come together in a rough, misshapen canvass, this is where I look at my story and think all sorts of disparaging things.

This is so boring. There is nothing original about this. At what point did I think this was a good idea? And what had I been smoking that morning?

Recently, I read a post by Scott Eagan that spoke to some of the realities in the publishing industry that get under writers’ skin and fester, spurring this revision syndrome.

Sure, editors want books to sell, but they also want a writer that can grow and develop over time. This means that it is your responsibility to find a way to keep progressing with your writing. Your job is to maintain that voice that you were signed for, but to always find a way to reinvent yourself…

…finding new twists and turns, it doesn’t mean simply putting it in a new setting, or changing from vamps and weres to angels and demons. We are talking about twists with the plot or characters voices.

As a writer, think about your writing as always moving forward and up. We don’t want to see the same thing over and over again.

So, yeah, I’m doing a little extra head banging to make the above happen. It’s not exactly comfortable, but I know I’m not alone. It’s nothing original or unique. Every writer feels it for their work at some point. I’ve heard many a colleague express the same sentiments. And I know it’s simply a phase, something that I’ll work through and love my story and the progress I’ve made once again…at some point.

Usually happens for me right around the 2/3 mark. About chapter 16-18 or so. When (if ever) does it happen for you?

The End…Sadness or Celebration?

>This is an excerpt from an article off of Absolute Write, a writing ezine.

*****
“Typing ‘The End'”
By Aaron Paul Lazar

There is a time in every author’s life when he or she experiences a sudden pang of loss, and sweet sorrow descends like soggy tissues on a broken heart. Man or woman, romance or action writer, sensitive poet or straight-shootin’ scene churner, it hits us one and all. It’s the moment we reach at the end of our long suffering days, those focused, driven, passionate hours, plastered with outpourings of words that evolved into our current work in process. The moment we type “The End.”

It happens to all of us. Sometimes there’s a delayed reaction and suddenly it sneaks up to slay us the next day. Macho man or lyrical lady, none are immune. In my case, I don’t actually burst into tears. But my throat tightens, a lump forms, and I fight back moisture that puddles and threatens to overflow.

My God. It’s over. What will I write tomorrow?

Read the whole article here.

*****

How about the same damn thing, all over again? It’s called REVISION. And I work on revisions until I’m about ready to kill off my hero and heroine, turn all the good guys bad and form a victor of my villain.

I have never had the feeling this writer talks about. Maybe I’m not emotionally invested enough in my story. Maybe I’m past emotional investment–like a marraige ending in divorce.

Have you ever felt this loss at The End?

>The End…Sadness or Celebration?

>This is an excerpt from an article off of Absolute Write, a writing ezine.

*****
“Typing ‘The End'”
By Aaron Paul Lazar

There is a time in every author’s life when he or she experiences a sudden pang of loss, and sweet sorrow descends like soggy tissues on a broken heart. Man or woman, romance or action writer, sensitive poet or straight-shootin’ scene churner, it hits us one and all. It’s the moment we reach at the end of our long suffering days, those focused, driven, passionate hours, plastered with outpourings of words that evolved into our current work in process. The moment we type “The End.”

It happens to all of us. Sometimes there’s a delayed reaction and suddenly it sneaks up to slay us the next day. Macho man or lyrical lady, none are immune. In my case, I don’t actually burst into tears. But my throat tightens, a lump forms, and I fight back moisture that puddles and threatens to overflow.

My God. It’s over. What will I write tomorrow?

Read the whole article here.

*****

How about the same damn thing, all over again? It’s called REVISION. And I work on revisions until I’m about ready to kill off my hero and heroine, turn all the good guys bad and form a victor of my villain.

I have never had the feeling this writer talks about. Maybe I’m not emotionally invested enough in my story. Maybe I’m past emotional investment–like a marraige ending in divorce.

Have you ever felt this loss at The End?