positive attitude

Positive Self-Talk–Examples

>

Yes, I know, I’m late.  I promised Tuesday and it’s Thursday.  Life–it’s my only excuse.
This is the third post in the theme of utilizing your subconscious in writing and life.  While the posts layer upon each other for a deeper understanding, they each stand alone as well.  For more information check out the previous posts:

Today I’m sharing a bunch of great examples of positive self-talk you can adopt, alter and make your own. 

I’m the type who always wants to know why something works.  If I get a crap answer, I’ll doubt the premise.  If I get a logical or scientific answer, I’m apt to believe.  Or, at least believe until something happens to make me doubt.

So…why does self-talk work?

  • Self-talk affects the subconscious mind.  It is the type of talk that chatters constantly in the back of our minds without specific, conscious thought.  Things we think, but don’t say.  Things we tell ourselves about ourselves or about our job or our life, but don’t rationalize or justify before we say them.
  • The subconscious mind is programmed similarly to the way a computer is programmed, so like a computer the subconscious mind will only perform the tasks it is programmed to perform.
  • Information presented to the subconscious mind causes both a psychological and a physiological response.
  • The subconscious mind does not hold any biases or beliefs other than those that have already been programmed in.
  • The brain records exactly what it receives without regard to where it comes from or how it get the information.  The brain doesn’t care whether the information is true or false, right or wrong.
  • The programming you accept from others and the conscious and unconscious directives, pictures, feelings and thoughts that you transmit to yourself in your own control center of the brain–the subconscious mind.

Those are just some of the reasons.  If you want to get down to the nitty-gritty, I suggest reading The Self-Talk Solution by Shad Helmstetter, which is one of the main sources of my information.  I’ve gathered other supporting information on this topic from various other experts in the field of psychology.

Before we get into the examples of what we should be saying to ourselves, it would be beneficial to recognize what types of phrases we should not be saying.

What NOT to say:

  • Nothing ever goes right.  (a.k.a. Could just one thing go right?)
  • I’m no good at … (fill in the blank)  (a.k.a. I’m not that creative/smart/ambitious)
  • Why should I try?  It won’t work out anyway.
  • I can’t get caught up.  (I don’t have enough time. This is too much work.)
  • I’ve tried, I can’t. 
  • What is wrong with me today?  (a.k.a. Why isn’t my mind working?)
  • It’s just not my day.
  • I’m so tired.

I’ve been guilty of just about every one of these in one form or another — for the better part of my life.  Hence, my generally negative/pessimistic personality for the majority of my years.

Now, I consciously make the effort to change my thoughts around by restructuring my sentences. 

Mini personal story:  At my work, there is one particular doctor who is incredibly challenging to work with.  My self-esteem always seemed to take a hit after a shift with her.  I developed my own “mantra” for self-talk repetition whenever we worked together.  I am enough. I do enough. I know enough.  This short, quick, easy little string of words greatly enhanced my working experience with her and reduced the stress during those days.

Things TO say:

  • I’m making progress.
  • I can handle this.
  • I’m willing to try.
  • I am in control of this.
  • I am excellent at … writing/singing/problem solving
  • I have a fantastic … mind/talent/ability with people
  • I keep trying.
  • I’ll get it.

So, here are a few examples for different parts of your life, although they are heavily weighted toward creativity/writing because that is my main audience here.  But you can take the base of any statement and change it to fit your specific situation and/or need.

Most of these are generalized.  I’ve put options related to how you could tailor them toward your writing life in (parenthesis).

**Remember, the key to making self-talk work isn’t simply repeating the words over and over.  But, visualize, feel it, live it and infuse gratitude

Creativity: Because creativity is the essence of writing.

It’s not a question of whether you can be more creative. The question is only whether you will allow yourself to exercise the creativity you already have. ~Shad Helmstetter

  • I see my own creativity as the key that unlocks my true potential (as an author).
  • I admire and respect others who use their own imagination to benefit themselves and others (their characters).
  • I know others see me and respect me as a creative, resourceful individual (writer).
  • I am not afraid to try the untried, walk new paths or search for new or better alternatives in my life (writing).
  • Today, I am more creative then ever before.
  • Since my imagination has no limits, my creativity knows no bounds.
  • The more I practice using my creative mind (writing), the more creative (successful) I become.
  • My own creativity allows me to unlock the source from which all ideas flow (bestsellers are born).
  • I am a bestseller. I am a bestseller.  I am…oh, sorry.  Got a little carried away there.

Overcoming the fear of failure: Because even multi-published authors fear this with every book.

  • I am never afraid to try. I enjoy staying with it and moving forward.
  • I give myself freedom to fail and reap the success those attempts have brought me.
  • I prepare myself with the knowledge and skill I need to succeed.

Getting more done: Because we writers are consummate procrastinators.

  • I place great value on taking action. I see what needs to be done and I do it.
  • Both the quality and the quantity of what I do (my writing) is important to me. The rewards I achieve are worth the investment I make.
  • I look forward each day to increasing my effectiveness (word count) and accomplishing more.

 Perseverance (and hope): Because no author would succeed without it.

  • I have faith, I have courage, I have belief–in myself and my writing.
  • Each day I have more hope and conviction in my ability to solve any problem (craft a novel worthy of the bestsellers list).
  • I never give up.  I am a winner, and I give myself the energy and belief to come out on top (of the bestsellers list).

Dealing with problems: Because in the publishing industry, there is no avoiding them.

  • I like challenges and meet them head on.
  • My will, my strength, my determination are always stronger than any problem I face.
  • I know every problem holds within itself the keys to its own solution.

Speaking and Writing with Confidence: Self-explanatory.

  • I have good ideas and I am able to express my ideas in a clear and interesting way.  (I’m a killer storyteller.)
  • People like the way I express myself, and they enjoy hearing my thoughts and ideas. (People love my writing and enjoy reading my novels).
  • My mind gives me the words I need, right when I need them.

Positive risk-taking: Because every new character, new plot, new story is a risk.

  • To me, a good risk is a bridge to my success and a doorway to greater opportunity (the next contract).
  • I am willing to accept those risks which are necessary for the fulfillment of my goals.
  • Any risk I accept is a healthy new force in my life.  A challenge and worthwhile goal.  Another win in the making.
  • I have the courage to do what I need to do (write on the edge) to get where I want to go (to the best seller’s list).

Improving your career: Because if you stagnate in the publishing sea, you get eaten by sharks.

  • I enjoy seeking and finding new opportunities in my life (publishing).
  • I never allow the word “no” to stop me or even slow me down.
  • I look forward and never look back.
  • I am creating a bright, positive, successful future for myself.
  • I know where I’m going (I will be a bestseller), and I’m well on my way.

Learning to say no (a.k.a. protecting your writing time): Essential skill for every author.

  • I carefully guard the time I set aside for things which are important to me (writing).
  • My time and energies are gifts which I protect and give by my choice, not the dictates of others.
  • Saying no is easy for me.  I am confident, self-assured and in control of my life.

I could go on and on, but I’m sure you get the idea.

I would love to hear some of your own positive self-talk. 

>Positive Self-Talk–Examples

>

Yes, I know, I’m late.  I promised Tuesday and it’s Thursday.  Life–it’s my only excuse.
This is the third post in the theme of utilizing your subconscious in writing and life.  While the posts layer upon each other for a deeper understanding, they each stand alone as well.  For more information check out the previous posts:

Today I’m sharing a bunch of great examples of positive self-talk you can adopt, alter and make your own. 

I’m the type who always wants to know why something works.  If I get a crap answer, I’ll doubt the premise.  If I get a logical or scientific answer, I’m apt to believe.  Or, at least believe until something happens to make me doubt.

So…why does self-talk work?

  • Self-talk affects the subconscious mind.  It is the type of talk that chatters constantly in the back of our minds without specific, conscious thought.  Things we think, but don’t say.  Things we tell ourselves about ourselves or about our job or our life, but don’t rationalize or justify before we say them.
  • The subconscious mind is programmed similarly to the way a computer is programmed, so like a computer the subconscious mind will only perform the tasks it is programmed to perform.
  • Information presented to the subconscious mind causes both a psychological and a physiological response.
  • The subconscious mind does not hold any biases or beliefs other than those that have already been programmed in.
  • The brain records exactly what it receives without regard to where it comes from or how it get the information.  The brain doesn’t care whether the information is true or false, right or wrong.
  • The programming you accept from others and the conscious and unconscious directives, pictures, feelings and thoughts that you transmit to yourself in your own control center of the brain–the subconscious mind.

Those are just some of the reasons.  If you want to get down to the nitty-gritty, I suggest reading The Self-Talk Solution by Shad Helmstetter, which is one of the main sources of my information.  I’ve gathered other supporting information on this topic from various other experts in the field of psychology.

Before we get into the examples of what we should be saying to ourselves, it would be beneficial to recognize what types of phrases we should not be saying.

What NOT to say:

  • Nothing ever goes right.  (a.k.a. Could just one thing go right?)
  • I’m no good at … (fill in the blank)  (a.k.a. I’m not that creative/smart/ambitious)
  • Why should I try?  It won’t work out anyway.
  • I can’t get caught up.  (I don’t have enough time. This is too much work.)
  • I’ve tried, I can’t. 
  • What is wrong with me today?  (a.k.a. Why isn’t my mind working?)
  • It’s just not my day.
  • I’m so tired.

I’ve been guilty of just about every one of these in one form or another — for the better part of my life.  Hence, my generally negative/pessimistic personality for the majority of my years.

Now, I consciously make the effort to change my thoughts around by restructuring my sentences. 

Mini personal story:  At my work, there is one particular doctor who is incredibly challenging to work with.  My self-esteem always seemed to take a hit after a shift with her.  I developed my own “mantra” for self-talk repetition whenever we worked together.  I am enough. I do enough. I know enough.  This short, quick, easy little string of words greatly enhanced my working experience with her and reduced the stress during those days.

Things TO say:

  • I’m making progress.
  • I can handle this.
  • I’m willing to try.
  • I am in control of this.
  • I am excellent at … writing/singing/problem solving
  • I have a fantastic … mind/talent/ability with people
  • I keep trying.
  • I’ll get it.

So, here are a few examples for different parts of your life, although they are heavily weighted toward creativity/writing because that is my main audience here.  But you can take the base of any statement and change it to fit your specific situation and/or need.

Most of these are generalized.  I’ve put options related to how you could tailor them toward your writing life in (parenthesis).

**Remember, the key to making self-talk work isn’t simply repeating the words over and over.  But, visualize, feel it, live it and infuse gratitude

Creativity: Because creativity is the essence of writing.

It’s not a question of whether you can be more creative. The question is only whether you will allow yourself to exercise the creativity you already have. ~Shad Helmstetter

  • I see my own creativity as the key that unlocks my true potential (as an author).
  • I admire and respect others who use their own imagination to benefit themselves and others (their characters).
  • I know others see me and respect me as a creative, resourceful individual (writer).
  • I am not afraid to try the untried, walk new paths or search for new or better alternatives in my life (writing).
  • Today, I am more creative then ever before.
  • Since my imagination has no limits, my creativity knows no bounds.
  • The more I practice using my creative mind (writing), the more creative (successful) I become.
  • My own creativity allows me to unlock the source from which all ideas flow (bestsellers are born).
  • I am a bestseller. I am a bestseller.  I am…oh, sorry.  Got a little carried away there.

Overcoming the fear of failure: Because even multi-published authors fear this with every book.

  • I am never afraid to try. I enjoy staying with it and moving forward.
  • I give myself freedom to fail and reap the success those attempts have brought me.
  • I prepare myself with the knowledge and skill I need to succeed.

Getting more done: Because we writers are consummate procrastinators.

  • I place great value on taking action. I see what needs to be done and I do it.
  • Both the quality and the quantity of what I do (my writing) is important to me. The rewards I achieve are worth the investment I make.
  • I look forward each day to increasing my effectiveness (word count) and accomplishing more.

 Perseverance (and hope): Because no author would succeed without it.

  • I have faith, I have courage, I have belief–in myself and my writing.
  • Each day I have more hope and conviction in my ability to solve any problem (craft a novel worthy of the bestsellers list).
  • I never give up.  I am a winner, and I give myself the energy and belief to come out on top (of the bestsellers list).

Dealing with problems: Because in the publishing industry, there is no avoiding them.

  • I like challenges and meet them head on.
  • My will, my strength, my determination are always stronger than any problem I face.
  • I know every problem holds within itself the keys to its own solution.

Speaking and Writing with Confidence: Self-explanatory.

  • I have good ideas and I am able to express my ideas in a clear and interesting way.  (I’m a killer storyteller.)
  • People like the way I express myself, and they enjoy hearing my thoughts and ideas. (People love my writing and enjoy reading my novels).
  • My mind gives me the words I need, right when I need them.

Positive risk-taking: Because every new character, new plot, new story is a risk.

  • To me, a good risk is a bridge to my success and a doorway to greater opportunity (the next contract).
  • I am willing to accept those risks which are necessary for the fulfillment of my goals.
  • Any risk I accept is a healthy new force in my life.  A challenge and worthwhile goal.  Another win in the making.
  • I have the courage to do what I need to do (write on the edge) to get where I want to go (to the best seller’s list).

Improving your career: Because if you stagnate in the publishing sea, you get eaten by sharks.

  • I enjoy seeking and finding new opportunities in my life (publishing).
  • I never allow the word “no” to stop me or even slow me down.
  • I look forward and never look back.
  • I am creating a bright, positive, successful future for myself.
  • I know where I’m going (I will be a bestseller), and I’m well on my way.

Learning to say no (a.k.a. protecting your writing time): Essential skill for every author.

  • I carefully guard the time I set aside for things which are important to me (writing).
  • My time and energies are gifts which I protect and give by my choice, not the dictates of others.
  • Saying no is easy for me.  I am confident, self-assured and in control of my life.

I could go on and on, but I’m sure you get the idea.

I would love to hear some of your own positive self-talk. 

Positive Self-Talk? Seriously?

>Yes. Seriously.

We all talk to ourselves.  (Writers probably more than most…maybe because we have little people running around in our heads.)  Whether we talk out loud or simply think concretely or even just let background chatter drift through our minds, we are all talking to ourselves all day long.

That talk can be good or bad.  It can support our goals and drive us to achieve or it can gut our drive to even try.  We often aren’t aware of what we’re actually saying to ourselves.  By neglecting to notice our negative self-talk we may be permitting a continual flow of worry and self-criticism.  But by recognizing the power of positive self-talk, we have the potential to bring about positive change in our lives.

I’ve struggled with the whole glass half full-glass half empty concept for decades.  I’d venture to say a lot of us have or still do.  The truth is, our outlook — pessimistic vs. optimistic (I also believe there is a state in between I call realistic) developed long before we had a choice. 

From the day we’re born, every word, every thought, every action became imprints placed on our subconscious by others.  Later on, in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood our own words, thoughts and images of how we view ourselves create a lasting impression in our subconscious–those concepts largely a product of how we were raised.

If your young years were filled with positivity, support, unconditional love and accolades at every turn — you’ve got a head start.  If you experienced more punishment than praise, more cynicism than support or more criticism than kudos — you have a little harder road to walk. 

Either way, as adults we have to create our own lives, and with the stresses and responsibilities of everyday life…the truth is…its rough.  If you’re a writer (by definition a tad more sensitive than the general population), the roller coaster ride toward publication, or even just attempting to express yourself competently, can take a toll on even the rosiest outlook.

The good news: no matter how positive or negative our early years, what successes or failures we’ve experienced, how many trophies or trials we’ve collected, we can all end up in the same place in our individual lives–one of achievement, comfort, contentment and positivity to the level of our own personal best.

The power is in cultivating our subconscious mind.  (No voo-doo involved.  Promise.)

I believe my success with positive self-talk is a result of a combination of techniques.  In the working form, positive self-talk is really a combination of self-talk, affirmations and the law of attraction.

  • Self-talk: thoughts regarding ourselves that pass through our mind.
  • Affirmations: a carefully formatted, positive statement that is repeated to one’s self.
  • Law of Attraction: A theory that states “like attracts like” and your dominant thoughts will find a way to manifest, good or bad. 

That said, we all know simply repeating, “I am happy.” “I am happy.” “I am happy.” will most likely lead to a hair-pulling event during which the affirmation slips into something more like, “I’m happy, dammit!”  “Look how frigging happy I am!”  “I’m as happy as a cricket in a freaking frogs belly for God’s sake!”  

So, here are a few tips that took my self-talk from mindless repetition to meaningful statements and turned my brain and my perspective around:

Visualize
We all know how to daydream.  That’s all visualization is–a daydream.  So, when you decide on the powerful self-talk statements, visualize that statement. 

  • Let’s say your statement is:  I am patient and flexible.  What would it look like to be patient?  Imagine yourself in a line at the store, relaxed, observing the surroundings, maybe chatting with the person ahead or behind you, with no one waiting on you, no where you have to be.  Imagine you have all the time in the world and waiting another minute or two won’t affect your life one way or the other.
  • Let’s say your statement is:  My daughter and I have a close relationship.  We are open and honest with each other.  What would it look like to be more in touch with your daughter?  Visualize yourself picking her up from school, relaxed, looking forward to seeing her.  Imagine listening, open and accepting, as she talks about her day.  See yourself being the empathetic positive influence you want to be. 

Imagine being your statement.  Being exactly what you want in your life.

Feel it
If you were to feel the patience in the first example above, what emotions would you feel?  What physical sensations would your body experience?

  • While you visualize yourself waiting in line, maybe the tension drifts out of your shoulders.  The muscles of your jaw relax.  Your stance eases. 
  • Because you’re not focused on how slow the line is moving, how that cashier should really think about retirement, how you have so much to do somewhere else, you notice that the woman in front of you is wearing the most beautiful scarf you’ve ever seen.  
  • Maybe you comment on it and make a new acquaintance.  Maybe you just enjoy the pattern and color.  Maybe it even gives you a new idea for a character you’re writing or a project you’re working on.  Maybe it simply makes you happy. 

That’s the great thing about day dreams — they’re all yours!  

Live it
Be the person in your visualization, and apply it to your every day life.  If you are the person with the open, warm relationship with your daughter (which you are–your self-talk confirms it), how would you go through your day?

  • Your openness would extend to others.  That acceptance and warmth would transform the relationships you have.  You would be more confident.  You would have closer connections throughout your life.  You would be a good listener, empathetic, warm.  You would be happier. 

Living what you tell yourself you are, creates the very life you want.

Infuse Gratitude
Gratitude in itself is a life-changing force.  The subject deserves a month of posts unto itself.  But I found this concept both a powerful catalyst for moving my self-talk and visualizations forward and a motivating force to continue the self-talk even on a bad day.

When you say to yourself: I am patient and flexible, you follow that self-talk with the sensation of gratitude.  Infusing gratitude into your self-talk often empowers me.  Often it even makes me smile…or laugh.

  • Traffic–there is test of patience.  How about: I am so glad I’m patient and flexible, because that means I’m not an asshole like the guy who just cut me off.  Or: I’m grateful my patience keeps me from stressing like that guy who just cut me off.  Man, it would suck to be him.

And what about your relationship with your daughter? 

  • Try something like: I’m so lucky to have this awesome relationship with my daughter.  Or: I’m so fortunate to have this gift in my life.

I’ll be back next Tuesday with lots of examples of positive self-talk for every area of your life and how to create your own.

In the mean time, if you’re interested in learning more about this topic, an excellent book is The Self-Talk Solution by Shad Helmstetter.

Can you share your experiences with self-talk, affirmations or the law of attraction?

>Positive Self-Talk? Seriously?

>Yes. Seriously.

We all talk to ourselves.  (Writers probably more than most…maybe because we have little people running around in our heads.)  Whether we talk out loud or simply think concretely or even just let background chatter drift through our minds, we are all talking to ourselves all day long.

That talk can be good or bad.  It can support our goals and drive us to achieve or it can gut our drive to even try.  We often aren’t aware of what we’re actually saying to ourselves.  By neglecting to notice our negative self-talk we may be permitting a continual flow of worry and self-criticism.  But by recognizing the power of positive self-talk, we have the potential to bring about positive change in our lives.

I’ve struggled with the whole glass half full-glass half empty concept for decades.  I’d venture to say a lot of us have or still do.  The truth is, our outlook — pessimistic vs. optimistic (I also believe there is a state in between I call realistic) developed long before we had a choice. 

From the day we’re born, every word, every thought, every action became imprints placed on our subconscious by others.  Later on, in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood our own words, thoughts and images of how we view ourselves create a lasting impression in our subconscious–those concepts largely a product of how we were raised.

If your young years were filled with positivity, support, unconditional love and accolades at every turn — you’ve got a head start.  If you experienced more punishment than praise, more cynicism than support or more criticism than kudos — you have a little harder road to walk. 

Either way, as adults we have to create our own lives, and with the stresses and responsibilities of everyday life…the truth is…its rough.  If you’re a writer (by definition a tad more sensitive than the general population), the roller coaster ride toward publication, or even just attempting to express yourself competently, can take a toll on even the rosiest outlook.

The good news: no matter how positive or negative our early years, what successes or failures we’ve experienced, how many trophies or trials we’ve collected, we can all end up in the same place in our individual lives–one of achievement, comfort, contentment and positivity to the level of our own personal best.

The power is in cultivating our subconscious mind.  (No voo-doo involved.  Promise.)

I believe my success with positive self-talk is a result of a combination of techniques.  In the working form, positive self-talk is really a combination of self-talk, affirmations and the law of attraction.

  • Self-talk: thoughts regarding ourselves that pass through our mind.
  • Affirmations: a carefully formatted, positive statement that is repeated to one’s self.
  • Law of Attraction: A theory that states “like attracts like” and your dominant thoughts will find a way to manifest, good or bad. 

That said, we all know simply repeating, “I am happy.” “I am happy.” “I am happy.” will most likely lead to a hair-pulling event during which the affirmation slips into something more like, “I’m happy, dammit!”  “Look how frigging happy I am!”  “I’m as happy as a cricket in a freaking frogs belly for God’s sake!”  

So, here are a few tips that took my self-talk from mindless repetition to meaningful statements and turned my brain and my perspective around:

Visualize
We all know how to daydream.  That’s all visualization is–a daydream.  So, when you decide on the powerful self-talk statements, visualize that statement. 

  • Let’s say your statement is:  I am patient and flexible.  What would it look like to be patient?  Imagine yourself in a line at the store, relaxed, observing the surroundings, maybe chatting with the person ahead or behind you, with no one waiting on you, no where you have to be.  Imagine you have all the time in the world and waiting another minute or two won’t affect your life one way or the other.
  • Let’s say your statement is:  My daughter and I have a close relationship.  We are open and honest with each other.  What would it look like to be more in touch with your daughter?  Visualize yourself picking her up from school, relaxed, looking forward to seeing her.  Imagine listening, open and accepting, as she talks about her day.  See yourself being the empathetic positive influence you want to be. 

Imagine being your statement.  Being exactly what you want in your life.

Feel it
If you were to feel the patience in the first example above, what emotions would you feel?  What physical sensations would your body experience?

  • While you visualize yourself waiting in line, maybe the tension drifts out of your shoulders.  The muscles of your jaw relax.  Your stance eases. 
  • Because you’re not focused on how slow the line is moving, how that cashier should really think about retirement, how you have so much to do somewhere else, you notice that the woman in front of you is wearing the most beautiful scarf you’ve ever seen.  
  • Maybe you comment on it and make a new acquaintance.  Maybe you just enjoy the pattern and color.  Maybe it even gives you a new idea for a character you’re writing or a project you’re working on.  Maybe it simply makes you happy. 

That’s the great thing about day dreams — they’re all yours!  

Live it
Be the person in your visualization, and apply it to your every day life.  If you are the person with the open, warm relationship with your daughter (which you are–your self-talk confirms it), how would you go through your day?

  • Your openness would extend to others.  That acceptance and warmth would transform the relationships you have.  You would be more confident.  You would have closer connections throughout your life.  You would be a good listener, empathetic, warm.  You would be happier. 

Living what you tell yourself you are, creates the very life you want.

Infuse Gratitude
Gratitude in itself is a life-changing force.  The subject deserves a month of posts unto itself.  But I found this concept both a powerful catalyst for moving my self-talk and visualizations forward and a motivating force to continue the self-talk even on a bad day.

When you say to yourself: I am patient and flexible, you follow that self-talk with the sensation of gratitude.  Infusing gratitude into your self-talk often empowers me.  Often it even makes me smile…or laugh.

  • Traffic–there is test of patience.  How about: I am so glad I’m patient and flexible, because that means I’m not an asshole like the guy who just cut me off.  Or: I’m grateful my patience keeps me from stressing like that guy who just cut me off.  Man, it would suck to be him.

And what about your relationship with your daughter? 

  • Try something like: I’m so lucky to have this awesome relationship with my daughter.  Or: I’m so fortunate to have this gift in my life.

I’ll be back next Tuesday with lots of examples of positive self-talk for every area of your life and how to create your own.

In the mean time, if you’re interested in learning more about this topic, an excellent book is The Self-Talk Solution by Shad Helmstetter.

Can you share your experiences with self-talk, affirmations or the law of attraction?

The Subconscious In Writing

When speaking of the conscious and unconscious mind, experts refer to the Iceberg Principal, comparing the conscious mind as the 10% above water and the subconscious mind as the 90% below water.

The power of the mind to change our perception of ourselves has always fascinated me.  Since I’ve been writing seriously, about a decade now, I’ve become even more interested in the subconscious mind and all the ouija board-like promises of creativity, focus, productivity, self-esteem and happiness if we could just control our subconscious.

Here are a few facts.  The subconscious mind:

  • Does not judge what you tell it, only takes all information as fact.
  • Can not tell the difference between true and false.
  • Works 24hours a day.
  • Takes everything literally.
  • Never says no.
  • Only recognizes the present.
  • Can be seen as the source of night dreams and automatic thoughts.
  • Is a repository for every thought, every visual, every emotion, every incident that has ever occurred in your lifetime.

Over the last ten years I’ve tried many techniques.  Unfortunately, my biggest problems weren’t with the techniques or the information, but with consistency and patience.  What do you mean I have to do it everyday?  What do you mean I have to do it for months to see the result?  Therefore, I didn’t get the results I sought and picked up the beliefs of so many others–it’s hype to sell books, fill seminar seats, in essence, pad pockets.

But aging has it’s benefits.  As does experience.  In the last year or two I’ve become more patient, more open-minded and more determined (could be translated into desperate, depending on the day) to crack that shell keeping my subconscious out of reach.

And as I’ve studied the conscious and unconscious mind through the eyes of knowledgeable professionals and tried various techniques created by experienced and renowned researchers, I’ve seen the benefits and know there are so many more to be cultivated with time, effort, knowledge and experience.  

What I’ve learned has been worth the wait and there is so much more to discover.  During the month of February, we’ll explore the potential benefits and powers of the subconscious mind including topics such as self-talk, affirmations, positivity and some even “further out” (or what my critique partner calls “woo-woo”) techniques, such as meditation, hypnotherapy and even tarot.

These topics will directly relate to writing, such as how they’ve helped me and/or how they could be used in other ways, but each technique could be applied to benefit any aspect of our lives.

I hope you’ll come back and join me on this path to understanding and utilizing the power of the subconscious mind to urge us toward achieving our ultimate best and welcome your comments and experience regarding the subconscious and how it has affected your personal and professional growth.

>The Subconscious In Writing

>

When speaking of the conscious and unconscious mind, experts refer to the Iceberg Principal, comparing the conscious mind as the 10% above water and the subconscious mind as the 90% below water.

The power of the mind to change our perception of ourselves has always fascinated me.  Since I’ve been writing seriously, about a decade now, I’ve become even more interested in the subconscious mind and all the ouija board-like promises of creativity, focus, productivity, self-esteem and happiness if we could just control our subconscious.

Here are a few facts.  The subconscious mind:

  • Does not judge what you tell it, only takes all information as fact.
  • Can not tell the difference between true and false.
  • Works 24hours a day.
  • Takes everything literally.
  • Never says no.
  • Only recognizes the present.
  • Can be seen as the source of night dreams and automatic thoughts.
  • Is a repository for every thought, every visual, every emotion, every incident that has ever occurred in your lifetime.

Over the last ten years I’ve tried many techniques.  Unfortunately, my biggest problems weren’t with the techniques or the information, but with consistency and patience.  What do you mean I have to do it everyday?  What do you mean I have to do it for months to see the result?  Therefore, I didn’t get the results I sought and picked up the beliefs of so many others–it’s hype to sell books, fill seminar seats, in essence, pad pockets.

But aging has it’s benefits.  As does experience.  In the last year or two I’ve become more patient, more open-minded and more determined (could be translated into desperate, depending on the day) to crack that shell keeping my subconscious out of reach.

And as I’ve studied the conscious and unconscious mind through the eyes of knowledgeable professionals and tried various techniques created by experienced and renowned researchers, I’ve seen the benefits and know there are so many more to be cultivated with time, effort, knowledge and experience.  

What I’ve learned has been worth the wait and there is so much more to discover.  During the month of February, we’ll explore the potential benefits and powers of the subconscious mind including topics such as self-talk, affirmations, positivity and some even “further out” (or what my critique partner calls “woo-woo”) techniques, such as meditation, hypnotherapy and even tarot.

These topics will directly relate to writing, such as how they’ve helped me and/or how they could be used in other ways, but each technique could be applied to benefit any aspect of our lives.

I hope you’ll come back and join me on this path to understanding and utilizing the power of the subconscious mind to urge us toward achieving our ultimate best and welcome your comments and experience regarding the subconscious and how it has affected your personal and professional growth.

Synchronicity

>Synchronicity: the coincidental occurrence of events and especially psychic events (as similar thoughts in widely separated persons or a mental image of an unexpected event before it happens) that seem related but are not explained by conventional mechanisms of causality —used especially in the psychology of C. G. Jung

~ Dictionary.com

Okay, it’s everywhere. Pretty darn weird actually. When similar things happen close to each other–say you want to buy a new car and you research Volvo’s the same day your boss at work comes in and announces she just bought the same make and model Volvo you were going buy–that’s coincidence. When it happens two or three times–your boss and your mother-in law bought Volvo’s the same week and your neighbors informs you they’re thinking about it too–that’s…strange.

When it happens repeatedly in a short span of time, that’s synchronicity.

My strange aura of synchronicity started with a bought of the blues I couldn’t break from for months. Recently, it’s gotten even worse. Not depression, per se, more just blah. Didn’t want to write, didn’t want to plot, didn’t want to dream up characters. Nothing felt exciting or even intriguing. And writing wasn’t the only thing I felt blase about…seemed everything was a shade of gray instead of their normal vibrant colors.

As I identify this series of events, I’m going to number them, to better illustrate the sheer bulk.

About 2 weeks ago, I decided I had to do something about it — I couldn’t stand living like that day in and day out, and it wasn’t going away on its own. I had taken a course with Eric Maisel via a local writers conference and had been inspired by his talk on creativity. He has several books out that I’ve been wanting to buy, but haven’t. I decided it was time to buy them.[[1]]

While I was waiting for my purchases to drift in from Amazon, I pulled out a book I’d bought about 3 or 4 years earlier, called The Self-Talk Solution. It was recommended to me by a friend for an entirely different purpose…I’m not even sure if I was writing at the time.

As I reread the book, [[2]] the information took on new meaning for me — deep meaning outlined with hope. I could get myself out of this funk, I could be the positive, upbeat person I’ve always wanted to be, I could control my thoughts and therefore my actions. And there was scientific proof and studies to prove it really works.

By the time I’d read through the first few chapters, Maisel’s first book came in the mail. [[3]] Within the first chapter, I read:

If we manage to change our self-talk we have done something profound, something more substantial than just making some innocent linguistic alterations…

A cognitive therapist teaches you to identify maladaptive self-talk, confront and dispute wrong thinking, and substitute new language that supports your intention to move in a certain direction.

Okay, that’s weird, I think, but only coincidental. Just gives me a nudge down the path I was already headed, like someone whispering, “That’s it, you’re going the right way.”

The very next day Theresa posts on Magical Musings — the topic, Creativity Coaching, the source of her information, Eric Maisel. [[4]]

Um, okay again. Wow. This is kinda weird, but I’m feeling strong, like I’ll have a lot of support when/if I search for sources on the subject, right?

And since I’m feeling so “in tune” with the subject, I decide I really AM going to start writing about it on my blog — I can’t be the only person/writer struggling in this way, right? So, to provide accurate information, I searched the Internet for studies and specialists on the topic. I found so many, my brain started to numb. The good thing about that — they were all saying the same things, over and over. Notice, there’s no number here because this in information I deliberately went out and sought. While I bought the books, I didn’t know they would echo this theory.

I went out to dinner tonight with my 11 yo daughter. Since we were both tired and had already talked for hours since school let out, we brought books to read. We were enjoying the blissful quiet at Applebee’s when she says, “Mommy, I want you to read something, it’s really funny.”

She turns about 30 pages **back** in her book from where she was reading and shows me the passage. It read:

You can’t keep the birds of sadness from flying over your head, but you can keep
them from nesting in your hair.
[[5]]

I got goosebumps.

When we got home, I did a little blog hopping. The first blog I click on with a new post was A Writer’s Edge, the post title: Yoga for Writers’ Block. [[6]] Here is an excerpt:

Yoga exercises are another technique for relieving the types of blocks that come
when you’ve sat too long, staring at a blank page or the computer screen. Blood
pools in our feet, breathing may slow or become shallow with anxiety, muscles go
slack (or worse, cramp). The body pumps out stress chemicals which do not
enhance creativity.

Oh, my God. If this isn’t the universe smacking me with a brick, I’m an oblivious idiot. I decide I really have to pursue this, study it, write about it. But before I tackle that, I’m going to have to check out today’s MM post by Edie. What do you think she mentioned? You got it — [[7]].

LaDonna visualizes herself getting a Rita! She practices her acceptance speech.
Cancer patients visualize Pac Men eating their bad cells. The Law of Attraction
says what we tell ourself and see for ourself will come true because our
subconscious will devise ways to make it be true. Going back to candybars, if I
see myself thin and healthy, I’ll eat thin and healthy. But if I see myself
pigging out on candybars, that’s what I’ll do.

Our thoughts, especially if we put emotion into them, come out in energy. Powerful energy.

I’m in a friggintwilight zone here.

All I can say is…I’m listening Universe. I finally heard you!

Stay tuned to my blog for more on this topic including excerpts from articles, studies, books, etc. Who couldn’t use a little dash of positive light in their life? No writer I know!

Have you ever experienced this type of synchronicity?

>Synchronicity

>Synchronicity: the coincidental occurrence of events and especially psychic events (as similar thoughts in widely separated persons or a mental image of an unexpected event before it happens) that seem related but are not explained by conventional mechanisms of causality —used especially in the psychology of C. G. Jung

~ Dictionary.com

Okay, it’s everywhere. Pretty darn weird actually. When similar things happen close to each other–say you want to buy a new car and you research Volvo’s the same day your boss at work comes in and announces she just bought the same make and model Volvo you were going buy–that’s coincidence. When it happens two or three times–your boss and your mother-in law bought Volvo’s the same week and your neighbors informs you they’re thinking about it too–that’s…strange.

When it happens repeatedly in a short span of time, that’s synchronicity.

My strange aura of synchronicity started with a bought of the blues I couldn’t break from for months. Recently, it’s gotten even worse. Not depression, per se, more just blah. Didn’t want to write, didn’t want to plot, didn’t want to dream up characters. Nothing felt exciting or even intriguing. And writing wasn’t the only thing I felt blase about…seemed everything was a shade of gray instead of their normal vibrant colors.

As I identify this series of events, I’m going to number them, to better illustrate the sheer bulk.

About 2 weeks ago, I decided I had to do something about it — I couldn’t stand living like that day in and day out, and it wasn’t going away on its own. I had taken a course with Eric Maisel via a local writers conference and had been inspired by his talk on creativity. He has several books out that I’ve been wanting to buy, but haven’t. I decided it was time to buy them.[[1]]

While I was waiting for my purchases to drift in from Amazon, I pulled out a book I’d bought about 3 or 4 years earlier, called The Self-Talk Solution. It was recommended to me by a friend for an entirely different purpose…I’m not even sure if I was writing at the time.

As I reread the book, [[2]] the information took on new meaning for me — deep meaning outlined with hope. I could get myself out of this funk, I could be the positive, upbeat person I’ve always wanted to be, I could control my thoughts and therefore my actions. And there was scientific proof and studies to prove it really works.

By the time I’d read through the first few chapters, Maisel’s first book came in the mail. [[3]] Within the first chapter, I read:

If we manage to change our self-talk we have done something profound, something more substantial than just making some innocent linguistic alterations…

A cognitive therapist teaches you to identify maladaptive self-talk, confront and dispute wrong thinking, and substitute new language that supports your intention to move in a certain direction.

Okay, that’s weird, I think, but only coincidental. Just gives me a nudge down the path I was already headed, like someone whispering, “That’s it, you’re going the right way.”

The very next day Theresa posts on Magical Musings — the topic, Creativity Coaching, the source of her information, Eric Maisel. [[4]]

Um, okay again. Wow. This is kinda weird, but I’m feeling strong, like I’ll have a lot of support when/if I search for sources on the subject, right?

And since I’m feeling so “in tune” with the subject, I decide I really AM going to start writing about it on my blog — I can’t be the only person/writer struggling in this way, right? So, to provide accurate information, I searched the Internet for studies and specialists on the topic. I found so many, my brain started to numb. The good thing about that — they were all saying the same things, over and over. Notice, there’s no number here because this in information I deliberately went out and sought. While I bought the books, I didn’t know they would echo this theory.

I went out to dinner tonight with my 11 yo daughter. Since we were both tired and had already talked for hours since school let out, we brought books to read. We were enjoying the blissful quiet at Applebee’s when she says, “Mommy, I want you to read something, it’s really funny.”

She turns about 30 pages **back** in her book from where she was reading and shows me the passage. It read:

You can’t keep the birds of sadness from flying over your head, but you can keep
them from nesting in your hair.
[[5]]

I got goosebumps.

When we got home, I did a little blog hopping. The first blog I click on with a new post was A Writer’s Edge, the post title: Yoga for Writers’ Block. [[6]] Here is an excerpt:

Yoga exercises are another technique for relieving the types of blocks that come
when you’ve sat too long, staring at a blank page or the computer screen. Blood
pools in our feet, breathing may slow or become shallow with anxiety, muscles go
slack (or worse, cramp). The body pumps out stress chemicals which do not
enhance creativity.

Oh, my God. If this isn’t the universe smacking me with a brick, I’m an oblivious idiot. I decide I really have to pursue this, study it, write about it. But before I tackle that, I’m going to have to check out today’s MM post by Edie. What do you think she mentioned? You got it — [[7]].

LaDonna visualizes herself getting a Rita! She practices her acceptance speech.
Cancer patients visualize Pac Men eating their bad cells. The Law of Attraction
says what we tell ourself and see for ourself will come true because our
subconscious will devise ways to make it be true. Going back to candybars, if I
see myself thin and healthy, I’ll eat thin and healthy. But if I see myself
pigging out on candybars, that’s what I’ll do.

Our thoughts, especially if we put emotion into them, come out in energy. Powerful energy.

I’m in a friggintwilight zone here.

All I can say is…I’m listening Universe. I finally heard you!

Stay tuned to my blog for more on this topic including excerpts from articles, studies, books, etc. Who couldn’t use a little dash of positive light in their life? No writer I know!

Have you ever experienced this type of synchronicity?